Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

View from a Scope | June 23, 2017

Scroll to top

Top

No Comments

What was the Star of Bethlahem?

What was the Star of Bethlahem?

The star of Bethlahem is synonymous with Christmas, but is it possible to link this famous star with an astronomical event.

Matthew 2:1-11:Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him… Then Herod…inquired of them diligently what time the star appeared. And he sent them to Bethlehem… When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy. And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother…” (KJV)

The star of Bethlahem is synonymous with Christmas, but is it possible to link this famous star with an astronomical event.

Mark Thompson, a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society believes he has discovered what it may have been.

Using historical records and computer simulations that allow the position of the stars and planets to be charted back to around the time when Jesus is believed to have been born, he was able to discern that there were three retrograde conjunctions where the planet Jupiter and a star called Regulus passed close to each other in the night sky.

A retrograde conjunction means that the planet Jupiter would pass Regulus in an easterly direction then appear to reverse and pass it again in a westerly direction before passing it a third time in its normal direction the east. This retrograde motion can happen because the outer planets in the solar system are orbiting the sun at a slower rate than Earth and so our planet occasionally overtakes them.

The three conjunctions, which took place on 14 September 3BC, 17 February 2BC and 8 May 2BC, which closely tie into the dates for the birth of Jesus.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/christmas/8211389/Star-of-Bethlehem-may-have-been-caused-by-movement-of-planet-Jupiter-scientist-claims.html

 

 

 

Submit a Comment