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View from a Scope | June 23, 2017

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Tonights View of the Sky – October 16th – Part 3

Tonights View of the Sky – October 16th – Part 3

Andromeda and Pegasus Constellations

This part of tonights view of the sky will focus on some of the brighter stars sitting between the Andromeda and Pegasus constellations.

When I went out the other night to find the 3 stars, Mirphak (Aplha Persei), Algenib (Gamma Persei) and Miram (Eta Persei) I took a few photos of the area. It wasn’t until I examined the photos that I noticed some other cool features.

So technically I did see these items just didn’t recognise or notice them until I looked at the photos.

What follows is a description of each of the stars I followed that helped me identify the Andromeda Galaxy in the photographs.

The area enclosed in blue is what I will concentrate on.

This area is the divide between the Andromeda and Pegasus constellations. The stars that helped me identify what I was looking at against the star charts were Lambda Pegasi and Sadalbari so we will start here.

Sadalpheris (Lambda Pegasi)

This is a yellow giant star, It is located about 394 light years from Earth. This star is sometimes referred to by its Arabic name Sadalpheris or Sad Al Faris, meaning Luck of the Stallion

Sadalbari (Mu Pegasi)

This star is located 106 light years from Earth. It is believed that this star has exhausted its supply of Hydrogen at its core and so has evolved into a giant star. Although it mass is similar to our Sun, its radius has expanded to almost 10 times the Suns radius.

Scheat (Beta Pegasi)

Scheat is located 196 light years from Earth . It is about 1500 times as bright as our Sun. Scheat forms one of the corners of the Great Square of Pegasus.

Matar (Eta Pegasi)

Matar is actually a binary star and is the fifth brightest star in the Pegasus constellation. It is located about 167 light years from Earth. The 2 stars orbit each other every 813 days.

Alpheratz (Alpha Andromedae)

This is the brightest star in the Andromeda constellation. It forms one of the corners of the Great Square of Pegasus. this makes it a connecting star between the 2 constellations Pegasus and Andromeda. It is about 97 light years from Earth, and is actually a binary star system.

 

The Great Square of Pegasus 

 

 

 

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